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20130127
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the press" conversation. this week a focus on foreign policy. it didn't get much attention in the president's inaugural address, but as his second term is underway, there's certainly a lot of focus on some of the big areas that he will be occupied by when it comes to national security and the world. what are some of the big bets that president obama can make to cement his legacy abroad? joining me is martin indyk of the brookings institution, an assistant secretary of state for president clinton and also the author of "bending history, barack obama's foreign policy." i got to take part in a conversation of big bets, black swans, a presidential briefing where you and the team at brookings write about both some of the real dangers in foreign policy as well as some areas where the president can make an impact if he so chooses. there's a lot to digest including the fact a new secretary of state is going to be presumably confirmed by the senate, john kerry. and yet in the financial times as we do this interview it is hillary clinton and the questions she faced about the death of our ambassador a
in washington. their writing has appeared in "the new york times," politico, foreign policy and washington monthly, among others. they came to us last night from virginia. they took the late night train and stayed here. and what i'd like to do is just turn it over to you for your thoughts and comments to start off. >> well, thank you very much. i'm going to start off for us today. let me start by thanking you for hosting us. it's a real honor and pleasure, and we look forward to an interesting discussion today. i'm going to start with two provocative themes from our new book, "going to tehran: why the united states must come to terms with the islam you can republic of iran." the first of these themes, and these two really get at the heart of our book. the first of these themes is that the united states is today and has been for the past few years a power in relative decline in the middle east. and the second core theme is that the biggest beneficiary of america's ongoing decline in the middle east is the islamic republic of iran. if you're not sure you agree with these propositions, i want
of the first administration's foreign policy and hillary clinton's tenure at state and i think the defining external event to the administration of foreign policy has been the arab spring, obviously, and all that uncorked and how to manage that. but before we get to that, we still have robin on satellite. i want to talk about the relationship between the president and hillary clinton and the degree to which the legacy of foreign policy in the first term has been hillary clinton's legacy and the degree to which it really has been -- the shots have been called from the white house because a lot of reporting on this has been very interesting. tonight there's going to be an interview on "60 minutes" that's a joint interview between the president and hillary clinton, a joint exit interview, and this is what the president had to say about hillary clinton's legacy. >> hillary will go down as one of the finest secretary of states we've had. it has been a great collaboration over the last four years. i'm going to miss her. i wish she was sticking around. but she has logged in so many miles i can't b
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with our foreign policy, there is no substitute for having the secretary of state develop personal relationships and get a direct feel from the people that she is trying to deal with and trying to move towards an american position, whatever that may be, so i don't think you can do it. i don't think you can send a substitute. it just goes with the territory. the secretary of state has to be prepared to travel all around the world. those personal relationships are critical for the ability of the united states to bring people along with her. >> she stands alone. no other secretary of state has ever traveled that much. they've never been away that much. >> maybe not that much, but secretaries of state have been traveling a heck of a lot more over the last few years. >> are you saying she has redefined the secretary of state position and role? >> no, no, no. >> i think what she does is a part and has been a part of the secretary of state role -- >> i bet they haven't even traveled a quarter of the miles. >> john, you ought to have somebody there -- >> she surpassed a predecessor, i thi
assignment, he faces some critical challenges as the president's foreign policy opens a new chapter. it's among the topics we will tackle with our political roundtable up next after this break. you can prevent gas with beano meltaways, or treat gas with these after you get it. now that's like sunblock before or sun burn cream later. oh, somebody out there's saying, now i get it! take beano before and there'll be no gas. [ coughs ] ♪ [ male announcer ] you can't let a cold keep you up tonight. vicks nyquil -- powerful nighttime 6-symptom cold & flu relief. ♪ >>> we're back with our roundtable. president and ceo of naacp ben jealous. incoming president of the heritage foundation, former senator jim demint. nbc news special correspondent for rock center ted koppel. nbc's own ted koppel. and associate editor for "the washington post," bob woodward. and nbc's chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell. welcome to all of you. a lot to get to. and as we react to paul ryan this morning, i want to show some of the headlines from the president's inaugural address. obama offers a libe
asked. t bigger question putting and placing benghazi scope of a broader failure of foreign policy. that's going to have to be what they are going to do if they are going to talk about chuck hagel is highlight the the obama's failures in this area and talk about chuck hagel is going to be yes man for that strategy. if they are not able to do that in a hearing like this which they have been pressing for four months it does not bode well. >> paul: what about her overall tenure at state? is there anything you can point to fall of qaddafi, that's now taken a negative term. there was an arm's control deal withe russia. you were not enamored of, as i recall. overall, what's her legacy? i mean, she is one of the most traveled secretaries of state. she did the public diplomacy part of her job to her credit well. she was sort of a very famous figure who went to many countries, in terms of her influence on obama policy or much less any sort of achievement it is impossible, at least to me to point to anything. what was even more remarkable about those hearings is that she sounded very hawkish on am
didn't manage to put benghazi into the broader of the president's meek foreign policy. it was score one for hillary and i think this was an attempt to kind of build on that and move beyond it and talk about hillary clinton's legacy as a whole rather than that event. >> chris: i want to pick up on that, brit. during the hearing what struck me was the republicans were tough on hillary on benghazi. the democrats weren't. both sides kept saying what a great secretary of state she had been and to praise her service. some of the accomplishment. helped assemble the bombing campaign in libya to topple khadafi. assembled the coalition with the toughest sanctions ever on iran and established diplomatic ties with burma. >> i think the examples would add up to a case for her competence. they do not add up to a case for greatness. the groundwork on burma had been ton by the previous administration and the administration properly followed through on it. are arabs and israelis closer to peace? how about iran and north korea and the nuclear programs? halted or seriously set back? has the reset with rus
't manage to put benghazi into the broader context of the president's weak foreign policy which i'll be important to them when they deal, for instance with the hagel nomination. so it was score one for hillary and i think it was an attempt to build on that and move beyond it and talk about her legacy as a whole rather than that event. >> chris: i want to pick up on that, brit. because, during the hearing, what struck me was the republicans were tough on hillary, on benghazi and the democrats weren't. but, both sides kept on saying what a great secretary of state she had been and to praise her service. and here's some of the points that have been brought up, some of her accomplishments. she helped assemble the bombing campaign in libya, to topple muammar qaddafi. she helped assembly the coalition that imposed the toughest sanctions ever on iran. and, she established diplomatic ties with burma. question, brit: how do you rate hillary clinton's performance, record as our top diplomat. >> i think those examples you cited would add up to a case for her competence. they do not add up to
mean, there are some big foreign policy issuehas that we're facing out there that didn't get touched you are right. vicki mentions egg legacy. piece of our time. which any written will remember as neville chamberlain's fame mutt comment coming back from the munich dealer hitler most begotten phrase whatsoever. it is astonishing to it me that that quote even is inadvertently and said in a different context slipped through the fact checkers and speech writerred and kno-ho-co in the mainstream media noted. >> i did. >> now there is "newsweek" magazine which is an online only publication i guess you would call it second coming. searches have long complained president obama thinks that of himself. now call they have made it official i guess. >> he was treated as messiah figure the first time around. the media put too much faith in politics and government it reflect their particular ideological bias. they really -- they are setting him up for a no fail secondin term. they are not going to hold him accountability didn't held him accountable in the. racist. viewer for the coverage of the "th
. prosecutors say he was motivated by fame and money. president obama has named a longtime foreign policy aide to be his next white house chief of staff. the president described him as a close friend not afraid to deliver a straight talk. mr. obamas said he played a key role in every national security decision of his administration. in northern mali, islamist militants destroyed when a strategic bridge. it is the bridge that thousands of african troops were planning to use to reinforce the battle against the rebels. even as the french-led military operation gathered strength, there are warnings of a humanitarian crisis. 350,000 people have been uprooted by the violence. we have this report from the central town. >> they may be hundreds of miles away from home, but these children still find a reason to play. 10 months ago, their family was forced to flee their home. armed militants were threatening them. the workforce in the women to cover their faces. this young unmarried woman says she was taken away and interrogated after she dared to speak to a male neighbor. >> they came and put their guns
this week's press pass conversation with vice president and director for foreign policy at the brookings institute, martin indyk, on some of the big bets president obama is making during his second term in foreign policy. that's on meetthepress@msnbc.com. we'll be back next week. if it's sunday, it's "meet the press." >>> weapons have no place. >> people need to feel safe. >>> more than six weeks since newtown and the gun debate takes center stage in d.c. you are watch msnbc. we will talk to connecticut senator about what is realistically going to get done. plus president obama sits down with hispanic caucus leaders to talk about immigration reform. congress woman sanchez was one at the meeting. >>> she is packing up and moving out and heading home. what is next for hillary clinton? we will check in with one of the long-time residents of hillary land. president obama is urging gun control advocates to listen to voices of americans who grew up hunting. if you grew up and your dad gave you a hunting rifle when you were ten and that became part of your family's traditions you would see why
are subscribers and readers which we've carried out in collaboration with foreign policy and lots of other conferences and publications around south asian affairs. so anyway, we're all very pleased to have this occasion to bring us together, and the purpose today is to have a very serious discussion about the ideas and subjects that are in the book and that are, obviously, still alive as dilemmas for american foreign policy. so let me introduce peter and welcome him to the podium. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, steve, and thank you for all of you coming today and for c-span for covering this. steve was instrumental in making this whole project happen, so i'm very grateful to him. thank you, also, to oxford university press which published the book and did, i think, a fine job in terms of presenting the material. thank you, also, to my co-editor, katherine, and thanks also to people here at the foundation, brian fishman, patrick doherty, jennifer roland and andrew lev witch who were also involved in making the book possible. as steve indicated, the reason we felt this project was neces
security hawk. very knowledgeable about foreign policy. he is a, wish there were a better term for this, he's a social conservative. that term will have to do. and he's a hell of a guy. ladies and gentlemen, the new senator from texas, r, and capital r, rafael ted cruz. \[applause] >> thank you so much. jay has been a dear friend a long, long time. i told jay please -- you know this past week was a momentous week -- oh, i need a mike? hello, hello. >> as they said in the 20 70 campaign, help is on the way. \[laughter] so when the mike wasn't working i told all sorts of embarrassing secrets about jay nordlinger and i trust all of you got them in full lurid detail. this past week has been a momentous week. president obama was sworn in to a second term. i guess what made the news is beyonce apparently lip synced throughout the inaugural. not as widely reported was the fact that president obama did as well. who knew that his teleprompter could play music? we saw this week an ode to liberalism, unabashed, unapologetic, i have to say sitting there it occurred to me somewhere the sea must be risin
promoted the internet and facebook, twitter as tools in diplomacy and foreign policy making, probably more than any other person working in our government. >> sounds like a very modern secretary of state but does come at a price in benghazi and that hearing she had where she said, does it really matter what happened on the ground? this will come back to haunt her no matter what she does. >> if she runs for president, though some of the sound bites from the hearings will obviously be used by her republican opponents and opponents and the like because there is a great retort to her that if you take that sound bite, it does matter and you hear republicaninging doing that this week. i would say benghazi is the low water mark. but plenty of other achievements. if she writes the memoir right she might be able to frame benghazi and the emotion she has of losing the lives of those americans in benghazi under her watch. >> she was criticized for not dumping bill during the monica lewinsky affairs. still one of the most admired woman in the world and leaves the secretary's position with very high nu
more like the president thinks when it comes to foreign policy this will be a team that might not push back as much with regard to cuts or withdrawals or smaller footprints or reluctant moves with new eras. in terms of the worth of the man for him and the job they receive there, not at all. >> since you went there, let me sort of switch where i was going and ask you about the smaller footprint. we having coming up the withdrawal of u.s. combat troops from afghanistan at the end of the year, and we are seeing republicans already going, no, i think we need -- lindsay graham on, talked about up to 20,000. it's too important not to leave a substantial footprint there, and yet i think that the general is right that we now have a team that seems to be more in sync with president obama and they want a very small footprint. you talked in your book about training the afghan security forces, are they ready for a total withdrawal of u.s. troops when the time comes? >> i think they are not ready for lack of a strategic partnership in america. i wouldn't try to tell senior officers how many people
will judge them a little bit differently. i think the decisions that he has made on foreign policy with respect to the war on terror will be viewed as some point in the future as more courageous and less in that than they are currently. they're less favorable in the size of government not shrinking the government spending. the interests of cutting him, cutting spending, cutting the size of the government the congressman when we talk about this is a guy by the name of jeff who isn't very well known was a advocate of cutting the earmarks and john mccain is a good candidate with wide appeal and he wasn't conservative because he is pretty moderate on a lot of issues like on global warming legislation, immigration, so i think that in some ways -- thye support his immigration policy, so in some ways republicans need to return to the reagan years but they also need to be proactive and advocating policies that have independent appeal. islamic in our short discussion we talk about religion. what do you say to people that think republicans are fundamental christians that are out of touch in
's going to be about whether the foreign and international security policies have worked. what the withdrawal from afghanistan is going to mean. how things are going in north africa, cuts in the defense budget. women in combat. the president's doing a lot in the foreign defense policy. in his first term, he was more moderate, he stayed in the center, he kept bob gates and general petraeus and leon panet a. now he has a doveish agend a. hillary clinton he was more hawkish than john kerry will be. i am worried personally for four years of the new obama team in national security. >> reporter: >> geraldo: you know, in that regard, i don't want to be a conspiracy theororrist, but let's review this week, on wednesday, he had hillary clinton, absolutely on the ropes, getting pounded over benghazi-gate, showing sound bites from the senators, grilling her, particular loo ron johnson from wisconsin. the very next day, you have the pentagon announcing that women will be in combat roles on the front line. nobody's talking about benghazi. they are talking about j.-- g.i. jane. is the obama
in the foreign defense policy. in his first term, he was more moderate, he stayed in the center, he kept bob gates and general petraeus and leon panet a. now he has a doveish agend a. hillary clinton he was more hawkish than john kerry will be. i am worried personally for four years of the new obama team in national security. >> reporter: >> geraldo: you know, in that regard, i don't want to be a conspiracy theororrist, but let's review this week, on wednesday, he had hillary clinton, absolutely on the ropes, getting pounded over benghazi-gate, showing sound bites from the senators, grilling her, particular loo ron johnson from wisconsin. the very next day, you have the pentagon announcing that women will be in combat roles on the front line. nobody's talking about benghazi. they are talking about j.-- g.i. jane. is the obama administration that slick to erase the benghazi controversy by playing a card that doesn't even take effect until 2016? >> yeah, i don't think so. i mean, i don't think it's going to do much good. these things will be judged on the merits. it is the obama administration
a dysfunctional foreign policy, we have a big problem with demographics and the retirement of the baby boom generation as a non-trivial problem, and we have a field of case triple the educational system by any kind of economic stance. we have the potential for really bad times if we do not change direction. this is good news, it isn't too late because the skill exponential and about eight years but we have about that kind of time frame in order to start moving. if we don't move in the next four or five years it becomes almost impossible mathematically to fix a problem without some kind of a social real upheaval that wouldn't be fun i don't think to date i happen to be even with the recent election results i happen to be fairly optimistic, and i know that sounds strange. i do think there are two things. i think for the american sense of life is a protector to the degree that americans fundamentally in some level don't like big government. they don't like big government, and when times seem to be going the wrong direction and get positive surprises like we did in 2010 when the american pushba
have to say this is an area where the obama administration foreign policies has not been successful. just to come back for a moment to the question of terrorism. i thought senator feinstein said something really important on your show when she talked about the need to reach out and form a broad coalition that would include russia, that would include china, that would include other nations that care about this new morphing, evolving, fragmented al qaeda. that's what george bush and george tenet did in 2001. they went knocking on every door around the world, every security service that faced a danger and said let's work together. let's figure out ways to share information, money if needed. and i heard senator feinstein saying let's do that again, and i thought it was a really good idea. >> schieffer: stephanie, what do you think? how do you see this administration now over these next four years? we heard the president's speech you talked about how, you know, he did lay out his priorities. but what's really important to them? what do you think they'll concentrate on? >> well, i think m
warmer. >> american foreign policy is also defined by food security, energy security, humanitarian assistance. it is define by leadership on life threatening issues like climate change. liz: washington watchdog say this could cost taxpayers a bundle. we have weber and lindsey here. phil, start with you, make your case. >> well, if you look at what his predecessor, hillary clinton, did in copenhagen, with a million a year in global warming, never made process, moving that domestically to get the funding for that. there's been a lot of secret treasury documents talking about a carbon tax. the president is coy about a carbon tax, but at some point, there's going to be a push for that in order to fund international transfers, and there's a secretary of state nominee who says it's the number one top priority, and it's been the focus of the coverage here in the beltway that this is a signal where the administration wants to go. liz: i think there's a lot to say about that. what do you think? >> well, it's about time the leader of the free world led on the topic frankly. like it or not, c
what they think about it and all the power vacuums created by our foreign policy lately are not clearly prepared to keep the peace when we get involved in the arab spring. my point to mr. nixon this isn't the nobel gee we think you are pretty swell award it should go to the christian and muslim leaders in nigeria who are working to bridge the police there. political dissidents in cuba and russia. people doing real on-the-groundwork. so lazy to give it to hillary clinton. just lazy. >> garland, what do you think. >> if the republicans had v. spent one/1,000th of the energy benghazi thinkingalling l figuring out whether there was weapons of mass destruction in iraq as opposed to four in benghazi. >> i do want to bring in, i threw this out in the twitter world in the facebook world and we got a huge response. people very opinionated about whether or not this should happen. one of those responses, mike, sanveri if alfred nobel knew how politicized his peace prize had become he would be rolling in his grave the entire panel has become a farce. s is it too politicized, mike? >> it's almost as
, when it comes to foreign po policy. this is going to be a team that might not push back as much with regard to cuts or withdrawals or smaller footprints. so i think there may be differences in policy, but in terms of the worth of man for handling the job, they received there, not at all. >> since you went there, let me just switch where i was going and ask you about the smaller footprint. because we do have coming up, the withdrawal of u.s. combat troops from afghanistan, at the end of the year, and we are seeing republicans already going no, i think we had lindsay graham on, we talked about up to 20,000. it's too important not to leave a substantial footprint there. and yet i think the general is right, that we now have a team that seems to be more in sync with president obama and they want a very small footprint, you talked in your book. are they ready for a u.s. troop withdrawal when the time comes. >> i certainly wouldn't try to sell senior officers exactly how many people are required. but i think we have offered a strategic partnership to afghanistan. >> it means trust, an
of the topics include foreign policy, and control, and women's abortion rights. it begins at noon eastern with cdc's "meet the press." at 1:00 p.m., but the ranking member of the foreign relations committees, senator john mccain, of addendas -- bob menendez. at two o'clock p.m. it is "fox news sunday." and assistant majority leader -- the state of the union follows at 3:00 p.m.. also a retired general and former cia director. administered by dianne feinstein and gov. bob macdonald of virginia and gov. scott walker of wisconsin. at 4:00, bob schieffer talks with senator dianne feinstein. the sending network talk shows this afternoon on c-span radio are brought to you by a public service by the network and c- span. the re-air begins -- you can listen to them all on c- span radio. nationwide on at some satellite radio channel 119. you can listen to on your smart phone or go online to c- spanradio.org >> what is the best training for a policeman? >> the best training -- you learn how to develop sources, you learn how the use intelligence information, you learn how to leverage relationships. t
also to develop a foreign policy that reflects, again, the dynamics of the region as they really are today. lastly, i think this is an opportunity for the committee to finally do the work that it should have been doing for years. when you read the record and realize we have never done an authorization of the state department in the six years i have been here, we have never looked at how foreign aid has been spent. we have never done a top to bottom review. it is something people like you come to this position, look at as something that is healthy. there was mention of cost. i was disappointed with the arb when the first thing that came out of the mouths of people i respect was money, money, money. this committee would have no idea whether the appropriate amount of money is being spent or if that could have prevented what was happening -- what happened because we have never had an authorization. i want to close again by thanking you for your service, thanking you for your friendship, thanking you for your transparency, and i certainly look forward to your testimony. i know it will
for the future. those used to be our partners in the future. we should be sending foreign aid to them, that the regime of president. my call to congress is you have to do something about it. you have to pressure the administration to have a different policy with regard to egypt. lou: north korea again threatening south korea, threatening the united states, threatening another nuclear test the prospect of more missile tests. what should be the u.s. response to what has, it looks to be, another adventuress regime in north korea. >> first, the equation is simple. the more north korean regime is going to do in terms of showing as the missiles, testing missiles demobilizing, threatening against the south koreans, and we don't do anything meaningful. meeting, we don't have a containment policy, the work even with the chinese and the russians to contain the north koreans. you do more of it. at some point in time there will show us the missiles with the bomb. the other byproduct of this is that other regimes, the iranian regime is looking at how we are not containing the north koreans, even a
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)